Burkholderia cepacia Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria is on the worrying threat level for virility - Antibiotic Research UK

Burkholderia cepacia Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria has a moderate threat level

Chris Garner Uncategorised 0 Comments

First Documented: 1949

Illness Caused: Pneumonia

Antibiotic Resistance: Low

Virulence: Worrying

First discovered in 1949 B.cepacia was discovered by Walter Burkholder in and is the bacteria that cause the common onion skin to rot.  Yes the one you leave in the pantry as it rolls to the back and creates that funky smell, and first described as a human pathogen or toxic poison in the 1950s.  Whilst the chances of fatal infection remain low with the little bacteria nasty it is only dangerous in extreme cases thankfully.  Most antibiotics are effective against this one, although once again the amazing cellular make of all bacteria make it able to survive in extreme conditions.  People who are most susceptible to infection are those that are pre disposed to lung conditions and the symptoms of pneumonia, which are persistent coughing, and fever.

  1. cepacia has a large genome, containing twice the amount of genetic material as E. coli

B.cepacia was discovered by Walter Burkholder in and is the bacteria that cause the common onion skin to rot. 

Burkholderia-cepacia-infection-antibiotic-resistant-with-a-worrying-threat-to-man---Antibiotic-Research-UK First Documented: 1949 Illness Caused: Pneumonia Antibiotic Resistance: Low Virulence: Worrying     First discovered in 1949 B.cepacia was discovered by Walter Burkholder in and is the bacteria that cause the common onion skin to rot.  Yes the one you leave in the pantry as it rolls to the back and creates that funky smell, and first described as a human pathogen or toxic poison in the 1950s.  Whilst the chances of fatal infection remain low with the little bacteria nasty it is only dangerous in extreme cases thankfully.  Most antibiotics are effective against this one, although once again the amazing cellular make of all bacteria make it able to survive in extreme conditions.  People who are most susceptible to infection are those that are pre disposed to lung conditions and the symptoms of pneumonia, which are persistent coughing, and fever.  B. cepacia has a large genome, containing twice the amount of genetic material as E. coli.